Assessing Teacher Technology Projects
 
Novice
Apprentice
Proficient
Expert
Content and Curricular Connections The project has no connection to class content or curricular goals and does not support school or department goals for learning and technology. The project has a tenuous connection to the course curriculum. The technology use addresses some but not all of the school and departmental goals. The project's technology use effectively supports content and curriculum. It also addresses school and department goals. The project's technology use effectively supports and links with curriculum. It affords new possibilities. The project's uses of technology directly support school and departmental goals for technology use and for student learning.

Student Learning Goals

There are no clearly stated learning goals. Educational goals are present but may not be appropriate or measurable. There are clear, age appropriate and measurable learning objectives. These goals accommodate different learning styles and abilities. Educational objectives are clear, age appropriate, and measurable. These goals accommodate different learning styles and abilities. Students are able to set their own learning goals and achieve them within the context of the project.
Role of Technology The project's use of technology treats students as passive recipients of information, is not well-defined, does not support student learning, or is a trivial or inappropriate use of the medium.

The project's use of technology is focused but does not take full advantage of the medium. Students use technology but do not learn to manipulate the technology to express ideas or concepts.

The project's use of technology is appropriate for the medium while helping students reach identified learning objectives. The choice of technology is age appropriate and supports different learning styles and abilities. The project's use of technology helps students achieve learning objectives and is both an appropriate and creative use of the medium. The choice and integration of technology is age appropriate and supports different learning styles and abilities. Students are engaged and demonstrate a deeper conceptual understanding of key concepts. Student learning, thinking and communication skills show improvement as a result of this use of technology.
Ethical Issues Students do not document sources, have little or no awareness of ethical issues and are not held accountable for unethical behavior. Teacher models unethical or questionable uses of technology. Students document sources most of the time but may be not consistent or complete. Students understand some of the ethical uses of technology. The teacher models some ethical uses of technology Students document sources effectively and correctly. Students understand and demonstrate a range of ethical uses of technology. The teacher models ethical uses of technology. Students document all sources effectively and correctly. Students understand, demonstrate and discuss the complexities of ethical uses of technology. The teacher consistently models ethical technology use and has designed a project or lesson to support learning about ethical issues.
Project Design The project seems incomplete or poorly conceived. The project’s scope is too large or too small. The teacher has not considered student learning needs. The project may be complete, but lacks depth. It does not offer strategies or adaptations for students with special needs or learning style preferences. The class time invested in the project may be too great given its education value. The project is complete, goes into depth as appropriate and provides some adaptations for students with special needs or learning style preferences. The teacher has considered scaffolding learning for both beginning and advanced students and fades away when appropriate. Students explore concepts by designing and creating a product. The project is complete, deep, well-scaffolded and adaptable. It offers extensions for more motivated or experienced learners and/or adaptations for students with special needs or learning style preferences. Students have opportunities to actively engage with the concepts and with technology by creating or designing a product themselves.
Role of the Teacher The teacher models helpless terror in the face of new technologies and gives up with faced with a problem. The teacher issues directions without encouraging students to understand and explore. The teacher has not planned an effective lesson and has not prepared or tested the necessary hardware and software. The teacher has planned a lesson with clear goals but has not anticipated how technology use will influence class dynamics, timing, learning and activities. The teacher may have tested some of the critical hardware and software. The teacher approaches technology with some trepidation but tries new or different approaches and asks for help. The teacher has designed and prepared an appropriate lesson and models good problem solving techniques by trying multiple solutions and incorporating others' ideas. The teacher's role is more of a facilitator than a directive leader. The teacher is well prepared and has planned an engaging, effective and meaningful lesson. The teacher demonstrates effective problem solving, exploration, creativity, and multiple solutions and effectively facilitates student learning and experiences. The teacher actively explores and learns with the students.
Instructions There are no written instructions or guidelines. There are written guidelines but they are outdated or incomplete Age-appropriate written guidelines reflect most of the curricular goals, provide clear directions, and may include assessment information or resources. Age-appropriate written guidelines reflect the overall curricular goals, provide clear directions, include assessment information and offer resources. All instructions have been tested, revised and modified to best meet student needs and to reflect overall goals.
Assessment There are no clear plans for formative or summative assessment or the forms of assessment do not match curricular goals. The teacher has planned for assessment but the assessment is inadequate or incomplete, is only formative or only summative, and may not reflect or measure the learning objectives. Both formative and summative assessment strategies are clearly articulated, logical, and fair. They are closely linked to the learning goals and adequately reflect student learning. The teacher employs multiple and alternative assessment strategies which directly correlate to educational objectives. The assessment strategies are logical, fair, and clearly articulated. Students reflect on their own experiences and learning.

Comments
Content and curricular connections
Learning goals
Use of technology
Ethical Issues
Project Design
Role of the Teacher
Instructions
Assessment

Questions
What and how did students learn? Include both intentional and unintentional lessons.
What did you learn?
What would you do differently if you were to do this project again?
What were the greatest successes of this project?
How would you improve this project?
What advise would you give a teacher contemplating a similar project?
What kinds of questions did students ask?
Where were students most often confused?
How did you address the needs of different learners in this project?
What resources were most helpful as you planned and implemented this project?