Lesson Plan Ideas

Related to Martin Martin Luther King Jr. and his life

Civic Responsibility: Civic Action: Students use primary documents including the " I have a Dream Speech" as a jumping off point for a discussion of civic responsibility and civic action.Students use the information contained in historical documents to classify ways citizens can influence government policy and gain an understanding that each individual can make a difference.

Non-Violent Social Change: Through primary documents students explore the concepts of non-violent social protest and change. Where did this philosophy begin, where has it been successful, where is it being used today?

Expository Writing: Analysis of the speech and supporting primary documents including vocabulary development, rhetorical structures (figures of speech), writing structure, and meanings relating to the speech.

Character Education: Lesson to analyze the content and tone of historical documents and determine which attributes of Dr. Martin Luther King's character contributed to his success as a minister, as a political activist and as an agent for social change.

What kind of a Peacemaker are You?: Designed to increase students awareness of skills needed to live peacefully in society. These skills include listening to each other, problem-solving, cooperating, mediating problems, decision-making, and communication. Students will recognize and explore aspects of peace both at home and throughout the world.

Art with a Message: Students study primary documents as inspiration for creation

Civil Rights History - Your History: A lesson which draws a connection between students' family history and the Civil Rights Movement. Students interview members of the community, parents and grandparents about the civil rights movement. What is their perspective? What progress have they seen? What do they think still needs to be accomplished?

Role Playing - Civil Rights Movement 1965 - Civil Rights Movement 2000: It is 1965, the class, separated into groups representing different viewpoints, prepares for a discussion/debate on the future direction of efforts to destroy segregation. The goal is to reach a majority decision after fully considering the pros and cons of each course of action. It is 2000, the class, separated into groups representing different viewpoints, prepares for a discussion/debate on the future direction of efforts to create equity in wages and education for all americans. The goal is to reach a majority decision after fully considering the pros and ocns of each course of action.

Fairness & Equality - A Paradox in American History: The idea that human beings are free, that they are not owned (whether by other human beings or by society at large), that they have freedom to live their own lives and to decide what shape those lives ought to take is at the heart of the American political tradition and is what peoples in other lands focus on first in their understanding of American history. The paradox between the stated rights in the Declaration of Independence and the reality of life for African Americans before the Civil Rights Movement is explored.